About your Search

20130117
20130125
STATION
CNNW 17
CSPAN2 13
CSPAN 10
SFGTV 9
CNN 8
KPIX (CBS) 8
MSNBCW 8
KGO (ABC) 7
KQED (PBS) 6
KRCB (PBS) 6
MSNBC 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
WETA 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 155
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 155 (some duplicates have been removed)
by board members. any appointments this evening? seeing none. i am pleased to introduce our elections commission report. delivered by our election commission appointee, catalina ruiz-healy. you can sit here. if you would like. >> good evening. superintendent, and new president and vice president and commissioners. thanks for having me. i was honored to receive your appointment in march, 2011, to be your appointee to the commission for the san francisco election department. you have received a memo from me. and i can go over it quickly, and i hope you had a chance to read it. but basically the city charter authorizes the election commission to supervisor the elections. and we are charged with a fairly narrow scope of work, for generally setting the department of elections and for the proper administration of the department. so the budget and we hire and fire the department of elections. so take a breath here. the way that the commission works on their on and off years. in 2011 our work focused on operations and less on policy. because we are getting ready to implement elections in the
. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issues were debated, the rights of gay and lesbian people, the right to vote because of the assault on the fundamental right to vote that took place in so many states, climate change, a continuation of our commitment to think medicare and social security and the noes thtion th inequality is not a necessary component of the economy. and we want to believe all of those issues. and i think what the president was saying, was, look, we have elections. and when you have a full debate in an election and the outcome is pretty clear cut, then it's his obligation and his right to move forward on all of those issues. >> and as we are watching the navajo nation just went by, their float, one of the things i saw today, melissa, is the whole changing of the demographics of america was reflected at the inauguration, as we look at native americans float goes by, as we heard a president for the first time refer in an inaugural address to same-sex marriage and to gay rights and talking about gender rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bib
. but the omens are not good. her coalition has just lost a regional election that was widely viewed as a test of public opinion. >> at first, it looked like the german chancellor's party would win. when the final ballots were counted, it became clear the democrats were on their way out. the results show the coalition of angela merkle's party or one seat behind the opposition. the loss by the christian democrats came about because their supporters tried to vote strategically. usually, christian democrat voters cast a ballot for free democrats. at first, they were thrilled at their score. >> i think it is no surprise some conservatives actually gave us a vote to make sure we would be able to continue with the coalition. >> as the votes were counted, it became clear the political blood transfusion had not work. .- worked how could she continued to help the free democrats across germany without hurting her own party poppies -- party potsies popularity. even her star power was not enough to turn things around. keeping the coalition partner ally came at a heavy price, one she may not want to pay ag
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact that and have them sign this very historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it does not sit in the president's piu anymore but it is one of those great pieces of history long associated with this church from 1856 to the present. one of the little-known facts about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, a worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. a lot of people feel that is something of a longstanding tradition, and it's not. it actually began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1943, when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the zero art -- before he took the oath of office in the depths of the great depression. he contacted the church and organized a special service with his former headmaster who participated with the church in coming up with a special service. they had that service at st. that was the felt way to start. he wrote letters later on saying he felt he got his administration off to the right f
we're celebrating is not the election or swearing-in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we'll see you tomorrow. [ applause ] ♪ >> the president of the united states, with the first lady and the vice president and the second lady over at the national building museum here in washington. the festivities only just beginning. getting ready for the big inauguration tomorrow. piers morgan is getting ready to take over our coverage. great to have you here on the national mall. >> very exciting. i have never done an inauguration before. incredibly exciting. i was struck there by the body of the language. seems very relaxed man and comes from being re-elected and facing another great, historic day, a man much more at ease than perhaps the nerve last time. >> four years as president and now another four years and he was elected pretty
that struck me about this conversation is something that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are talking about. in this measure. we are talking about giving hope to so many people who live in parts of this country, parts of the world where they cannot fathom being true to who they are; they cannot fathom being honest to themselves let alone other people about their sexual orientation. something that struck me about
in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated al qaeda, as some in the administration were talking about earlier? >> well, we have i think decimated a lot of al qaeda's top leadership particularly in the afghanistan-pakistan region. but i think wh
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
can still win elections without them. >> well, david, five states where gop lawmakers have introduced billed making it illegal to enforce president obama's new executive action and gun proposals, another example of states' rights and nullifications. the states of tennessee, wyoming, south carolina and north dakota. so here we are with a states' rights movement live and well in 2013. this is unreal. >> well, i don't think these guys truly understand the constitution. under the constitution, which they claimed to cherish, you know, it's not yahoo sheriffs who get to decide whether something is constitutional or not. it's something called the supreme court. so right away, they're undermining our entire system by issuing their edicts or their fiats against these actions. but i'm still waiting. i'm waiting for any of these guys to come out and say okay, 23 executive actions? which ones don't you like? the ones that make it easier for universal background checks to be -- to happen as they should be happening, just on the basis of regulations and guidances? what law -- which executive action
at the white house. newly elected members of the congress, only 27 of the newly-elected house members showed up. and more recently. no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had they all attended, they would have joined not only nancy prksz pelosi and harry reid but tommy lee jones. as tip o'neil said, love the sinner, hate the sin. we need to get back to a time when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neil. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here's hoping that it sill it spills over to the next four years. both sides become more social, more civil and, hence, more productive. thanks for being with us. politics nation with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, michael. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, i'll second that. we're just three days away from history. president obama will be sworn in for the second time on the steps of the capital. and he looks pretty happy about it. take a look at his official second term portrait released today. that's a man who won a decisive election. who's proud of h
, democrats running for re-election and most of them come from midwestern, western states. they have strong, rural communities and therefore are a lot more open to maintaining gun rights and so you will have a lot of these democrats who will be very nervous voting for any big changes and harry reid is one of them. the national rifle association stayed out of the reelection race and he owes it to them to perhaps temper the debate and not necessarily let all of this go through. >> that's one reason why you're seeing the president take executive action and that's something you heard critics and people who had been his supporters criticized him for not doing more of that in his first term and he's signaling that he's willing to do more of that on these big fights and it's about seizing the moment because the further and further you get from the sandy hook tragedy, the less you're likely to achieve and he's trying to make this happen swiftly. >> let's talk about second terms. how have presidents comparatively, how have they feared in his second term. that's when the big scandal happens. the iran
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
days after a tough re-election victory over republican mitt romney but right back to work for a president getting regular updates on the terror attack in algeria a reminder of the grave threat from al qaeda, one of many looming second-term challenges hanging over the swearing in where the aides say the address will bring the nation together. >> people here in washington need to seek common ground he will make that point. >> there are other signs suggesting the opposite such as defiant tone at the news conference last week and a new group made up of fore campaign aides now planning to pressure congress. >> i was surprised this week to see him transition the campaign committee into an ongoing campaign-style effort to have an impact on the washington debate because it doesn't seem the lesson of the first term that worked out very well. >> those battles begin again on tuesday, for now it is pomp and circumstance. >> starting with vice president biden getting sworn in after 8:00 a.m. because justice sotomayor had to rush to new york city for a book signing. >> we will walk out,
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
for its two-time elected democratic president, to say nothing of the first african-american president, it brings together all of the best about this country. >> jennifer: you can see where they're playing from. they just had a shot of actually -- actually from inside the view of a tuba. they had a shot of them, they're up on the platform which is elevated, right. overlooking the mall. so it is a beautiful spot for them to be. right above them is where the president will take the oath. that's where all of the elected officials are seated, where they're seated as well. marine band will be playing for quite awhile here. almost an hour of the lead up to the inauguration. >> it is an aaron sorkin kind of day. west wing kind of day. a day where ritual and politics becomes an important part of keeping the democratic tradition alive. as someone who sometimes sat on the cynical side of things. clearly, it is a representation of the imperial presidency. >> jennifer: we're seeing dick durbin walking right now into the steps, as he's going up, he was obviously a lead player in so much of the putt
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
, working to desegregate the deep south. >> the fact that obama could be elected again shows that the stone of hope, it came out of the mountain of despair that king spoke of and there is hope. >> reporter: a sentiment likely shared by so many on the mall today, including the man they all came to see. cecilia vega, abc news, washington. >>> and here again, george stephanopoulos, great to spend the day with you. so, did anything happen today that changed the political possibilities? >> i don't think so. one day, one speech cannot dot that. even though this is the day where all of america comes together, and that was one of the big themes of the president's speech. but one of the things i did think we saw today was a very changed president. and this is a very different time and a very different president from the one who took office four years ago. the speech four years ago, a dark speech. for a dark time. we were mired in crisis. the economy beginning to come back. and what you saw today is, the president gave a meditation on freedom and equality. it was a president who else felt free. >> an
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
tester is glad to be in this parade. he got re-elected. >> after a tough battle, that's for sure. >> this is the wind river dancers, the wind river reservation all the way from wyoming. they are here to honor all of us with their performance. $6,000 short of their scaled-down fundraising. they are marching anyway and doing an excellent, excellent job. right now i want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer here in washington, d.c. we're right across from the president of the united states on the reviewing stand. there it is, the reviewing stand on the north lawn of the white house. kate bolduan is here, jim acosta is here and we're in "the situation room," a special edition of the situation room watching the wind river dancers from the wind river reservation in wyoming performing for the president of the united states. he's still there. he's still in the reviewing stand. the first lady, sasha and malia have gone inside. i suspect they have to get ready for the balls for tonight. >> it's a very special day, obviously, but a very long day
"the five" thinks about it. this is a moment you predicted on election day what happened. what are your thoughts overall? >> bob: as a progressive, a great populist speech. it would remind me of what taft would have said and huey long would have said. it is a -- for those of us on the left, it was a reaffirming speech. it was one that, where he underscored what he has been saying all along. there is a place for government. government does help a lot of people get places. we don't agree on that obviously, but -- >> dana: do you think that has s what he has been saying all along? if you compare the 2008 speech to this one, it's the same? >> bob: what i would say in this without sour grapes. in 2008 he tried to break across the gridlock and he didn't get anywhere so now he will go alone. >> eric: a lot of people on the right said he thinks he has a mandate because he was re-elected. his speech sounded like i have a mandate for the next term, the next four years. he talked about gay rights and climb change. weeping entitlement off the table. equal pay and immigration. those are things we'll
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
of the world in this election in whh he did well with minorities and younger voters and so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so too hopes his second term will speak to that. >> rose: we conclude this evening with part one of a two-part conversation about the presidency of barack obama and the next four years joined by doris kearns goodwin, jon meacham, bob woodward, bob caro, and michael beschloss. >> i know it's the consensus that we're -- barack obama has to do is get along with the republicans. i'd like to say something about that. president obama is fond of quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare everyone's saying we have
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 155 (some duplicates have been removed)